News and Products

Reduced lung-cancer Mortality with volume CT screening in a randomized trial

The joint Dutch-Belgian Nelson trial was set up to address the issue of the limited amount of  data available  from randomized trials as to whether volume-based, low-dose computed tomographic (CT) screening can reduce lung-cancer mortality among male former and current smokers. The results have now been published (de Koning HJ  et al Reduced Lung-Cancer Mortality with Volume CT Screening in a Randomized Trial. N Engl J Med. 2020 Jan 29. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1911793). In the trial, a total of 13,195 men (primary analysis) and 2594 women (subgroup analyses) between the ages of 50 and 74 were randomly assigned to undergo CT screening at T0 (baseline), year 1, year 3, and year 5.5 or undergo no screening. It was found that, at 10 years of follow-up, the incidence of lung cancer was 5.58 cases per 1000 person-years in the screening group and 4.91 cases per 1000 person-years in the control group; lung-cancer mortality was 2.50 deaths per 1000 person-years and 3.30 deaths per 1000 person-years, respectively

The authors conclude that in this trial involving high-risk persons, lung-cancer mortality was significantly lower among those who underwent volume CT screening than among those who underwent no screening. There were low rates of follow-up procedures for results suggestive of lung cancer.

doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1911793.